The History of the Armistice Day Storm

 
Local Coast Guardsmen testified their 30-foot surfboat became stuck in mud and they had no success in freeing her.

Armistice Day Storm

Then they spotted Clyde Cross, a well-known Pentwater fisherman, and crew aboard his fish tug Three Brothers. They said Cross passed within 100 feet of our boat, but he would not stop to help us despite us yelling for help.

Armistice Day Storm

Cross said no one ever heard a call for help. He sailed straight to the Novadoc, gettng all 17 men safely ashore. That created the controversy that still lingers for some in Petwater.

Armistice Day Storm

On one side was the Coast Guard saying Cross ignored their call for assistance. On another was Cross and his crew insisting they never heard a call for help.

Armistice Day Storm

There was yet another side. Some asked if Cross and his crewmen figured there might by reward money from the Canadian company or even the Canadian government.

Armistice Day Storm

Cross denied that ever crossed his mind. The Canadian government later did award Cross a silver platter.

Armistice Day Storm

The findings from the hearing went to Washington, and never publicly released. In 1975, former U.S. Congressman Guy VanderJact, at the urging of the Daily News, found that the record of the hearing had been destroyed in a government warehouse fire in St. Louis three years before.

Armistice Day Storm

No public information from the hearing was ever released.

Armistice Day Storm