The History of the Armistice Day Storm

 
Two of them, however, were enroute to Ludington and battled huge waves and a southwesterly wind before finally docking.

Armistice Day Storm

The City ofSaginaw 31was more than six hours late, and the Pere Marquette 21 managed to dock after a five hour trip from Manitowoc through what her captain called mountainous waves.

Armistice Day Storm

The storm's second wave hit around 4:30, doing the most damage. A Ludington man was severely injured when a wall collapsed, crushing his car and sending him to the hospital with head injuries.

Armistice Day Storm

But the drama of the storm was on Lake Michigan. Two Canadian and an American ship were lost, and the Ludington carferry City of Flint 32 was aground on the north side of the north breakwater just off Court Street.

Armistice Day Storm

Two ships, the 400-foot Anna C. Minch, (Canadian) and the 460-foot William B. Davock (American) were lost with all hands between Ludington and Pentwater.

Armistice Day Storm

A third vessel, the Novadoc, a 253-foot coal carrier owned by a Canadian company, went hard aground on a sandbar at Juniper Beach breaking the ship nearly in two. Two Novadoc crewmen were washed overboard and never found.

Armistice Day Storm

When the City of Flint went aground around 8 p.m. the Ludington Coast Guard found its immediate concern was the precarious situation of the Flint, its 45 crewmen and four passengers.

Armistice Day Storm